Runners Finished Bigfoot 200-Mile Endurance Race-ULTRAMARATHON

Endurance Trail Race  From AUGUST 10-14, 2018  Challenge yourself to a continuous multi day adventure along some of the best trails the Pacific Northwest has to offer. You might even see Bigfoot! You will not regret it.

bigfoot200 ultramarathon
Photo: facebook.com/bigfoot200/

According to the chronline.com The Bigfoot 200, in its fourth year, starts at the Marble Mountain Sno Park near Mount St. Helens, tracking 200 miles of trail through the Gifford Pinchot National Forest and finishing at White Pass High School in Randle. Runners have four days to finish the course; the event record was set last year at just more than 62 hours.

In a statement for the chronline.com the event’s founder and organizer Candice Burt,  said:

“The Gifford Pinchot National Forest is a world-class trail running destination,” “This event might be the most scenic 200-miler. It’s definitely the most challenging 200-mile event in the United States.”

The event has grown in leaps and bounds already. The 150 entrants this year is up from 100 last year. Another 350 runners took part in lower-mileage Bigfoot events.

The days-long event is unlike many other sports. Though it’s a competitive event, runners realize it’s an accomplishment just to finish. Last year, Doorn had the honor — yes, the honor — of being the last-place racer. It wasn’t a disappointment. It meant she hadn’t quit.

“As long as I don’t have a bone popping out and I don’t have a bloody leg, I will continue,” she told the two crew members and friends who had come out to support her. “There were lots of very, very demoralized moments. I really wanted to drop.” Despite that, she kept going to keep her word to her friends. In tribute to her grit, the other finishers formed a line at the finish and cheered her on as she made her way in.

“It felt like a miracle,” Doorn said. “Really surreal. So many people helped me. The love is so strong.”finishes her statement.

Burt said that sentiment is common in long-distance trail running, noting competitive racers who have stopped to help each other out.

Bigfoot wanders through the parking lot before the start of his namesake Bigfoot 200 at the Marble Mountain Sno Park Friday. The race finished Randle this weekend after 200 miles of trail running through the Gifford Pinchot National Forest.

“We really are out there for each other first,” she said. “I think a lot of us do these races over and over again to see our friends, and it’s like a big party on the trails.”

Cameron Hall, another Seattle native who finished Bigfoot last year, explained the special elements that made him return.

“It’s the deep forest, it’s the climbs — I can’t believe I’m saying that,” he laughed. “Some hallucinations.”

To Hall, one of the most memorable aspects was running through the night.

“It feels like a dream state,” he said. “The overnights, it’s a headlamp and everything’s closed in. You’re just following, tracking and God knows what kind of thoughts are happening all through that. It’s just kind of like this long, semi-dream, semi-reality experience.”

bigfoot200 ultramarathon
Photo: facebook.com/bigfoot200/

The Bigfoot 200 sets the race bar high, both in terms of course difficulty and quality of race staff and volunteers. The well-marked, point-to-point course is gnarly and relentless, but the volunteers are  friendly, prepared, and encouraging that most of the amateur runners are able to finish the race in under 100 hours without crew. Aid stations are always stocked with made-to-order burritos, cheeseburgers, and a huge selection of vegan food, and the medical staff is right on point, expertly treating the battered runners feet and keeping them moving down the trail. The only thing better than the people at Bigfoot? The spectacular views.

Runners set off at the start of the Bigfoot 200 at the Marble Mountain Sno Park Friday. The race finished  in Randle this weekend after 200 miles of trail running through the Gifford Pinchot National Forest.

The description of the run from participants is from big to extraordinary. The climbs, the remoteness, the views, the distance traveled, the time you are out there, the hearts of the volunteers – are all SO BIG in scale!! A perfect descriptive phrase is “tough & beautiful”. Born on the heels of a successful inaugural Tahoe200 this race is a success on it’s own.

Challenge yourself next year to a continuous multi day adventure along some of the best trails the Pacific Northwest has to offer. You might even see Bigfoot! You will not regret it.

Quick Facts for the Bigfoot 200

42,000+ feet (12,802 meters) of ascent. More than 86,000 feet of elevation change.

206.5 miles, non stop, point to point!

6 Sleep Stations with full aid, hot food, medical, and crew access

14 full aid stations with hot food, medical, and more.

The race starts at Mount St. Helens in the Cascade Mountain Range of Washington State and finishes in Randle, WA traversing point to point the Cascade Mountains.

big foot 200 ultra
Photo: https://www.bigfoot200.com

The race is August 10-14, 2018.

 

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